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The TKI is designed to measure a person's behavior in conflict situations.

"Conflict situations" are those in which the concerns of two people appear to be incompatible.

Negotiators have a tendency to negotiate from one of five styles: competing, accommodating, avoiding, compromising, or collaborative. According to observation over the last two decades of hundreds of negotiator behaviors and perspectives and confirmed through negotiation literature, generally people approach negotiations from one of these five styles and exhibit the certain characteristics.

These are adapted from Thomas Kilmann’s conflict styles and tend to correlate well in negotiation, especially given that there is sometimes tension when two or more parties are trying to meet their differing or conflicting needs. Competing: Negotiators that exhibit this style are assertive, self-confident, and focused on the deal and results.

Compromising may be more practical when time is a factor • Can provide a temporary solution while still looking for a win-win solution • Lowers the levels of tension and stress resulting from the conflict • Important values and long-term objectives can be derailed in the process • May require close monitoring and control to ensure the agreements are met • May not work if initial demands are too great • Does not contribute to building trust in the long run • There is a risk to be abused, i.e.

the opponent may constantly try to take advantage of your tendency toward smoothing/accommodating.

Different stakeholders may have different priorities; conflicts may involve team members, departments, projects, organization and client, boss and subordinate, organization needs vs. Following are the techniques one needs to apply based on the circumstances.

" Because no two individuals have exactly the same expectations and desires, conflict is a natural part of our interactions with others.

Kilmann (August 2015):"The Joy of Having Created the TKI Assessment!

When we say “Conflict”, the first word comes to our mind is Fight, Avoid, Anger, Lose, Pain, Control, War, Hate, Impasse, Loss, Destruction, Bad, Fear, Wrong doing, Mistake etc., As you can see, conflicts is almost universally perceived as a negative occurrence. Often, a conflict presents opportunities for improvement.

As I shared in my last blog post that a conflict is a situation when the interests, needs, goals or values of involved parties interfere with one another. Therefore, it is important to understand (and apply) various conflict resolution techniques.

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