Carbon dating shroud of

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The Shroud has attracted widespread interest ever since Secondo Pia took the first photograph of it in 1898: about whether it is Jesus' purported burial cloth, how old it might be, and how the image was created.

According to radiocarbon dating done in 1988, the cloth was only 728 years old at the time.

Other researchers have since suggested that the shroud is much older and that the dating process was incorrect because of neutron radiation – a process which is the result of nuclear fusion or nuclear fission during which free neutrons are released from atoms – and its interaction with the nuclei of other atoms to form new carbon isotopes.

However, no plausible physical reason has yet been proposed to explain the origin of this neutron radiation.

(Phys.org) —An earthquake in Old Jerusalem might be behind the famous image of the Shroud of Turin, says a group of researchers led by Alberto Carpinteri of the Politecnico di Torino in Italy in an article published in Springer's journal Meccanica.

They believe that neutron radiation caused by an earthquake could have induced the image of a crucified man – which many people believe to be that of Jesus – onto the length of linen cloth, and caused carbon-14 dating done on it in 1988 to be wrong.

The researchers therefore believe that neutron emission from a historical earthquake in 33 A. in Old Jerusalem, which measured 8.2 on the Richter Scale, could have been strong enough to cause neutron imaging through its interaction with nitrogen nuclei.

On the one hand, this could have created the distinctive image on the Shroud through radiation imagery, while on the other, it could have increased the level of carbon-14 isotopes found on the linen fibres that could have confused the 1988 radiocarbon dating tests.

Many Christians are grateful to Whiting for first knowledge of the recent refuted dating challenge, as well as his gifted ability to describe the sequences of events in an unambiguous manner. Catholic Weekly reported on January 11, 2009: "The author of one of the most influential books on the Shroud of Turin, Brendan Whiting, has died in Sydney, aged 73.

His book, The Shroud Story, published in 2006, rebutted scientific tests carried out in 1988, that interpreted the shroud as a fraud made in the 14th century.

It renewed support for the authenticity of the Shroud on the persuasive grounds that the tiny samples of cloth taken for chemical testing were remnants of nearly invisible mending done in the Middle Ages and that in 2005 further examination of the corner of the cloth from which samples for testing were taken proved to be different in chemical composition from the main part of the cloth.

Research in the 1980s suggests the image was "forged" on the cloth between 12, , the BBC reports.

Since the shroud and "all its facets" still cannot be replicated using today's top-notch technology, researchers suggest it is impossible that the original image could have been created in either period.

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